Thomas Hardy

Biographical Details

Occupation: Novelist

Occupation: Poet

Occupation: Architect

Born: Higher Bockhampton, Dorset (2 June, 1840)

Died: Dorchester, Dorset (11 January, 1928)

Events and Key Dates

  • 1856-62: Articled to John Hicks, a Dorchester architect, for four years, then emploted as as architect's clerk.
  • 1862: Begins work in London for Arthur Blomfield, who designed and restored churches.
  • 1865: Hardy publishes a prose sketch in Chambers's Journal, 'How I Built Myself a House'.
  • 1868: Sends manuscript of first novel, 'The Poor Man and the Lady', to the publisher Alexander Macmillan, who rejects the novel but offers encouraging advice, as does the reader. The novel was never published and the manuscript was subsequently lost.
  • 1869: Hardy invited to join the architectural practice of G. R. Crickmay in Weymouth; begins writing Desperate Remedies.
  • 1870: Macmillan rejects Desperate Remedies; William Tinsley agrees to publish it on receipt of £75 from Hardy. Later, while planning the restoration of a church in St. Juliot, Cornwall, Hardy meets and becomes engaged to Emma Lavinia Gifford.
  • 1871: Desperate Remedies published. Offers manuscript of Under the Greenwood Tree to Macmillan, who suggests Hardy resubmit it early in the next year. Hardy instead sells to Tinsley.
  • 1872: Publishes Under the Greenwood Tree.
  • 1873: A Pair of Blue Eyes, Hardy’s first novel to be published under his name.
  • 1874: Far from the Madding Crowd serialised in Cornhill Magazine and published as a book. Marries Emma Gifford on 17 September.
  • 1875: First published poem, ‘The Fire at Tranter Sweatley’s’ (later named ‘The Bride-Night Fire’), in Gentleman’s Magazine.
  • 1876: The Hand of Ethelberta, published. The Hardys move to Sturminster Newton, north Dorset.
  • 1878: The Return of the Native begins serialisation in Belgravia in January, after being rejected by both Leslie Stephen and John Blackwood as unsuitable for family reading.
  • 1879: New Quarterly Magazine publishes two short stories, ‘The Distracted Preacher’ and ‘Fellow-Townsmen'.
  • 1880: The Trumpet-Major begins serialisation in Good Words in January, published in volume form in October. Hardy falls ill during the writing of A Laodicean and dictates it to Emma.
  • 1881: The Hardys move to Wimborne; A Laodicean is published in volume form.
  • 1882: Serialisation begins of Two on the Tower, with volume publication in October.
  • 1883: Publishes ‘The Three Strangers,’ ‘The Romantic Adventures of a Milk-Maid,’ and ‘The Dorsetshire Labourer’.
  • 1883: The Hardys move to Dorchester; construction of Max Gate begins in November.
  • 1885: The Mayor of Casterbridge completed in April; the Hardys move into Max Gate in June.
  • 1886: Serial and volume publication of The Mayor of Casterbridge.
  • 1887: The Woodlanders is published in volume form in March, when the Hardys take a holiday in Italy.
  • 1888: Wessex Tales and ‘The Profitable Reading of Fiction’ published.
  • 1890: ‘Candour in English Fiction’ published, and A Group of Noble Dames begins serialisation in December.
  • 1891: A Group of Noble Dames published in volume form in May; Tess of the d’Urbervilles, begins serial publication in July and is published in volume form in December.
  • 1892: Hardy’s father Thomas dies in July. Serial publication of The Pursuit of the Well-Beloved begins in October.
  • 1893: Hardy meets Florence Henniker for the first time in Dublin. They maintain a friendship over almost thirty years, exchanging letters regularly.
  • 1894: Life’s Little Ironies published in February. Serial publication of Jude the Obscure begins in December.
  • 1895: Jude the Obscure published in volume form. First collected edition of Hardy’s work begins to appear, published by Osgood, McIlvaine.
  • 1897: The Well-Beloved published in volume form in March.
  • 1898: Hardy publishes his first poetry collection, Wessex Poems and Other Verses.
  • 1899: Hardy responds to the Boer War (1899-1902) through a series of poems published in national newspapers.
  • 1901: Poems of the Past and the Present published in November, dated 1902.
  • 1903: First part of The Dynasts is ready for publication in December with most copies dated 1904.
  • 1904: Hardy’s mother Jemima dies in April.
  • 1906: Part Second of The Dynasts is published in February.
  • 1908: Part Third of The Dynasts is published in February.
  • 1909: Time’s Laughingstocks published in December. Hardy becomes President of the Society of Authors.
  • 1910: Hardy awarded the Order of Merit by King George V in July and receives Freedom of Dorchester in November.
  • 1912: The Wessex Edition (Macmillan) begins to appear. Hardy receives the Gold Medal of the Royal Society of Literature in June. Emma Hardy dies in November. Hardy begins the sequence of ‘Poems of 1912-1913’.
  • 1913: Hardy visits St Juliet, Boscastle in March. He accepts an honorary fellowship at Magdalene College, Cambridge,in July
  • A Changed Man and Other Tales published in October.
  • 1914: Hardy marries Florence Dugdale in February.
  • Satires of Circumstance published in November.
  • 1915: Death of Frank George, son of Hardy’s second cousin and his chosen heir, at Gallipoli in August. Death of Hardy’s sister Mary in November.
  • 1916: Publication of Selected Poems of Thomas Hardy.
  • 1917: Moments of Vision published in November.
  • 1919: Collected Poems published in October. In the same month, Hardy receives a ‘Poet’s Tribute’, a bound volume of holograph poems by 43 contemporary poets, each one signed.
  • 1920: Hardy receives message of congratulations on his 80th birthday from King George V.
  • 1922: Hardy receives honorary degree from University of St Andrews, and is made an honorary fellow of Queen’s College, Oxford; Late Lyrics and Earlier published in May.
  • 1923: Prince of Wales (later Edward VIII) visits Hardy at Max Gate.
  • 1924: Stage adaptation of Tess performed in Dorchester.
  • 1925: Human Shows published in November.
  • 1928: Hardy dies on 11 January, after falling ill in December 1927. On 16 January, in a double ceremony, his ashes are interred in Westminster Abbey, and his heart in the churchyard at Stinsford.
  • Winter Words is published in October. The first volume of his autobiography, The Early Life of Thomas Hardy, appears over Florence’s name in November; the second volume, The Later Years of Thomas Hardy, follows in 1930.

Linked Open Data Sources

General References

Further Reading

Letters (100)

2nd July, 1863: Letter from Horace Moule to Thomas Hardy [H.4470]

Letter from Horace Moule to Thomas Hardy with advice on writing, 2 July 1863

2nd August, 1872: Letter from William Tinsley to Thomas Hardy [H.5651]

Letter from William Tinsley to Thomas Hardy. Agreement for serialisation of A Pair of Blue Eyes, 2 August 1872

29th November, 1872: Letter from Reverend Caddell Holder to Thomas Hardy [H.3449]

Letter from Rev. Caddell Holder, Rector of St Juliot's, to Thomas Hardy mentioning the young woman, Emma, that he had met on his visit to St Juliot's and who was to become his first wife, 29 November 1872

17th February, 1874: Letter from Sir Leslie Stephen to Thomas Hardy [H.5506]

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Thomas Hardy suggesting a change to one of the chapters in the serilaised version of Far From the Madding Crowd, 17 February 1874

12th March, 1874: Letter from Sir Leslie Stephen to Thomas Hardy [H.5507]

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Thomas Hardy with advice on how to word Troy's seduction of Fanny Robin in the serialisation of Far From the Madding Crowd, 12 March 1874

13th April, 1874: Letter from Sir Leslie Stephen to Thomas Hardy [H.5508]

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Thomas Hardy with suggested changes to the serialisation of Far From the Madding Crowd, 13 April 1874

18th November, 1874: Letter from Katharine Macquoid to Thomas Hardy [H.4152]

Letter from Katharine Macquoid to Thomas Hardy on the character of Bathsheba in Far from the Madding Crowd, 18 November 1874

7th December, 1874: Letter from Sir Leslie Stephen to Thomas Hardy [H.5512]

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Thomas Hardy congratulating him on his recent marriage to Emma Gifford, 7 December 1874

19th February, 1878: Letter from Arthur Hopkins to Thomas Hardy [H.3481]

Letter from Arthur Hopkins to Thomas Hardy about drawing the character of Eustacia for The Return of the Native, 19 February 1878

20th February, 1878: Letter from Thomas Hardy to Arthur Hopkins [H.3482]

Copy of a letter from Thomas Hardy to Arthur Hopkins about illustrations for The Return of the Native, 20 February 1878

19th September, 1878: Letter from George Smith to Thomas Hardy [H.5244]

Letter from George Smith on terms of publishing for The Return of the Native, 19 September 1878

26th November, 1881: Letter from E Dunkin to Thomas Hardy [H.5043A]

Letter from the Royal Observatory to Thomas Hardy regarding his request to visit as part of his research for Two on a Tower, 26 November 1881

27th November, 1881: Letter from Thomas Hardy to E Dunkin [H.5043B]

Draft reply from Thomas Hardy to the Royal Observatory regarding his request to visit, circa. 27 November 1881

21st March, 1882: Letter from Thomas Hardy to [unknown] [H.1947.37.25]

Letter from Thomas Hardy to the Land Stewart to the Earl of Ilchester concerning freehold at Stinsford Hill, 21 March 1882

24th August, 1885: Letter from Robert Louis Stevenson to Thomas Hardy [H.5358]

Letter from Robert Louis Stevenson to Thomas Hardy asking if he can call on Hardy while visiting Dorchester, 24 August 1885

19th September, 1886: Letter from Mowbray Morris to Thomas Hardy [H.4403]

Letter from Mowbray Morris, editor at Macmillan, to Thomas Hardy discussing The Woodlanders, 19 September 1886

16th March, 1887: Letter from Tillotson & Son to Thomas Hardy [H.5559]

Letter from Tillotson & Son to Thomas Hardy suggesting Hardy writes another novel as long as The Woodlanders and offering a thousand guineas for serial rights, 16 March 1887

22nd March, 1887: Letter from Sir Edmund Gosse to Thomas Hardy [H.2712]

Letter from Edmund Gosse to Thomas Hardy, about The Woodlanders, 22 March 1887

28th August, 1887: Letter from Sir Edmund Gosse to Thomas Hardy [H.2713]

Letter from Edmund Gosse to Thomas Hardy about his current low mood and an upcoming trip to Devon, 28 August 1887

15th December, 1891: Letter from William Morris to Thomas Hardy [H.4401]

Letter from William Morris to Thomas Hardy on Far from the Madding Crowd & The Return of the Native, 15 December 1891

2nd May, 1892: Letter from Andrew Lang to Thomas Hardy [H.3855]

Letter from Andrew Lang to Thomas Hardy concerning his review of Tess of the d'Urbervilles, 2 May 1892

5th May, 1892: Letter from Andrew Lang to Thomas Hardy [H.3856]

Letter from Andrew Lang to Thomas Hardy concerning his review of Tess of the d'Urbervilles, 5 May 1892

1st April, 1897: Letter from Sir Edmund Gosse to Thomas Hardy [H.2722]

Letter from Edmund Gosse to Thomas Hardy, about negative reviews and women in journalism, 1 April 1897

9th February, 1899: Letter from William Paton to Thomas Hardy [H.4689]

Letter from W. R. Paton to Thomas Hardy on the use of horses in war, 9 February 1899

11th July, 1900: Letter from Alfred Housman to Thomas Hardy [H.3495]

Letter from A. E. Housman to Thomas Hardy about visiting him in Dorchester, 11 July 1900

29th November, 1905: Letter from Bradford Daniels to Thomas Hardy [H.2035]

Letter from a reader, Bradford K. Daniels, to Thomas Hardy showing appreciation for Hardy's works and referring to Tess of the d'Urbervilles and Jude the Obscure, 29 November 1905

23rd July, 1906: Letter from Sir Edmund Gosse to Thomas Hardy [H.2735]

Letter from Edmund Gosse to Thomas Hardy on the illustrations for Far From the Madding Crowd, 23 July 1906

25th July, 1906: Letter from Thomas Hardy to Sir Edmund Gosse [H.2774]

TS copy of a letter from Thomas Hardy to Edmund Gosse regarding the illustrator of Far From the Madding Crowd, 25 July 1906

3rd October, 1907: Letter from William Courtney to Thomas Hardy [H.1628]

Letter from William Courtney to Thomas Hardy declining to publish the poem 'A Sunday Morning Tragedy' in the Fortnightly Review, 3 October 1907

6th February, 1908: Letter from Mary Hardy to Thomas Hardy [H.3001]

Letter from Mary Hardy to Thomas Hardy on her new teaching post in Denchworth, 28 November 1862

6th February, 1908: Letter from Katharine Hardy to Thomas Hardy [H.2999]

Letter from Katharine Hardy to Thomas Hardy regarding the Prince of Wales visiting Dorchester, 17 July 1923

6th February, 1908: Letter from Thomas Hardy to Captain John Acland [H.709]

Letter from Thomas Hardy to Dorset County Museum's curator John Acland regarding presentation of a collection of his books for the museum library, 6 February 1908

8th June, 1909: Letter from F Bland to Thomas Hardy [H.4597]

Letter from a reader, F. M. Bland, to Thomas Hardy about Tess of the d'Urbervilles, 8 June 1909

21st July, 1909: Letter from May Sinclair to Thomas Hardy [H.5225]

Letter from May Sinclair to Thomas Hardy on the psychology of Tess of the d'Urbervilles, 21 July 1909

30th May, 1910: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3172_1]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy arranging for Hardy to come to lunch, 30 May 1910

27th September, 1910: Letter from Thomas Hardy to Captain John Acland [H.710]

Letter from Thomas Hardy to Dorset County Museum's curator, John Acland, on presenting a collection of his books to the Museum's library, 27 September 1910

22nd August, 1911: Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker [H.3128]

Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker discussing his travels in the South West and animal welfare, among other matters, 22 August 1911.

14th November, 1911: Letter from Captain John Acland to Thomas Hardy [H.700]

Letter from Dorset County Museum's curator John Acland to Thomas Hardy on receipt of MS of The Mayor of Casterbridge, 14 November 1911

28th November, 1912: Letter from Charles Gifford to Thomas Hardy [H.1913]

Condolence letter from Charles Gifford to Thomas Hardy following the death of Emma Hardy, 28 November 1912

29th November, 1912: Letter from Sir George Douglas to Thomas Hardy [H.1911]

Condolence letter from George Douglas to Thomas Hardy following the death of Emma Hardy, 29 November 1912

25th October, 1913: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3173_1]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy on various topics including gardening and Hardy's poetry, 25 October 1913

20th November, 1913: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3174]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy discussing his works, as well as various other matters, 20 November 1913

21st December, 1913: Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker [H.3135]

Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker on the cruelties inflicted upon performing animals and various other matters, 21 December 1913.

17th January, 1914: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3175]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy on poetry, film adaptation and performing animals, 17 January 1914

5th February, 1914: Letter from Lady Alda Hoare to Thomas Hardy [H.3441]

Letter from Alda Hoare to Thomas Hardy on animal welfare, 5 February 1914

11th February, 1914: Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker [H.3136]

Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker notifying her of his marriage to Florence Dugdale, 11 February 1914.

12th February, 1914: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3176]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy concerning his marriage to Florence Dugdale, 12 February 1914

6th March, 1914: Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker [H.3137]

Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker telling her more about his marriage to Florence Dugdale, 6 March 1914.

20th March, 1914: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3177]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy discussing his poem 'Beyond the Last Lamp', 20 March 1914

10th June, 1914: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3178]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy sending him belated birthday wishes and expressing her disapproval of the new physiological laboratories at Cambridge, 10 June 1914

11th June, 1914: Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker [H.3138]

Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker discussing his life, his poetry and the issue of vivisection, 11 June 1914.

11th July, 1914: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3179]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy on his poetry, the Irish question and her home, 11 July 1914

1st November, 1914: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3180]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy on the First World War and war poetry, 1 November 1914

25th November, 1914: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3181]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy sharing her thoughts on Satires of Circumstance, 25 November 1914

17th January, 1915: Letter from Virginia Woolf to Thomas Hardy [H.5954]

Letter from Virginia Woolf to Thomas Hardy expressing her appreciation of his writing, 17 January 1915

17th January, 1915: Letter from Ezra Pound to Thomas Hardy [H.4816]

Letter from Ezra Pound to Thomas Hardy asking for his opinion on his poetry, 17 January 1915

19th February, 1915: Letter from Frank Theodore to Thomas Hardy [H.4609]

Letter from a reader, Frank Theodore, to Thomas Hardy expressing his enjoyment of Tess of the d'Urbervilles and relating some of his experiences of living in Dorset, 19 February 1915

31st March, 1915: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3182]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy on his poetry, politics and the First World War, 31 March 1915

23rd April, 1915: Letter from May Morris to Thomas Hardy [H.4398]

Letter from May Morris to Thomas Hardy asking permission to include a quotation in an introduction to her father's collected works, 23 April 1915. In this letter May Morris refers to Tess of the d'Urbervilles but the reference is to Far from the Madding Crowd.

23rd May, 1915: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3183]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy asking him to write a testimonial for her German companion to remain in Britain, 23 May 1915

28th May, 1915: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3184_1]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy thanking him for writing a testimonial for her German companion to remain in Britain, 28 May 1915

24th August, 1915: Letter from Brigadier-General Cathcart Hannay to Thomas Hardy [H.2573A]

Copy of a letter from Cathcart Hannay to Thomas Hardy informing Hardy of the death of his second cousin, Frank George, 24 August 1915

3rd September, 1915: Letter from James Grieves to Thomas Hardy [H.2574]

Letter from James P. Grieves to Thomas Hardy about the death of Hardy's second cousin Frank George, 3 September 1915

1916: Letter from Louisa Conyers to Thomas Hardy [H.4600]

Letter from Louisa Conyers to Thomas Hardy about Tess of the d'Urbervilles and the phantom Turberville coach, 1916

24th February, 1916: Letter from Siegfried Sassoon to Thomas Hardy [H.5131]

Letter from Siegfried Sassoon to Thomas Hardy on the First World War, 24 February 1916

25th August, 1917: Letter from Daphne Bankes to Thomas Hardy [H.846]

Letter from a reader, Daphne Bankes, to Thomas Hardy asking for his autograph, 25 August 1917.

24th October, 1917: Letter from Charlotte Logier Baker to Thomas Hardy [H.838]

Letter from a reader, Charlotte Logier Baker, to Thomas Hardy asking for help, 24 October 1917.

30th September, 1918: Letter from M. R. James to Thomas Hardy [H.3737]

Letter from M. R. James to Thomas Hardy inviting him to visit, 30 September 1918.

6th July, 1920: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3185]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy about a recent expedition, 6 July 1920

24th October, 1920: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3186]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy about the death of her dog, the Council of Justice and Two on a Tower, 24 October 1920

13th November, 1920: Letter from Ezra Pound to Thomas Hardy [H.4814]

Letter from Ezra Pound to Thomas Hardy inviting him to contribute a poem to the Dial, 13 November 1920

21st November, 1920: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3187]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy on his poetry and various other matters, 21 November 1920

12th March, 1921: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3188]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy about a lecture on John Keats and on the death of Sir Frederick Wedmore, 12 March 1921

15th April, 1921: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3189]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy on various matters including his wife's recent visit to London 15 April 1921

26th May, 1921: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3190]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy on animal welfare issues and another lecture on John Keats, 26 May 1921

8th June, 1921: Letter from Scofield Thayer to Thomas Hardy [H.4815]

Letter from Scofield Thayer to Thomas Hardy acknowledging receipt of the poem The Two Houses for the Dial, 8 June 1921

5th July, 1921: Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy [H.3191]

Letter from Florence Henniker to Thomas Hardy about film adaptations and various other matters, 5 July 1921

19th December, 1921: Letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker [H.3166A]

Friendly letter from Thomas Hardy to Florence Henniker, 19 December 1921

9th May, 1922: Letter from Lala Fisher to Thomas Hardy [H.2389]

Letter from a reader, Lala Fisher, to Thomas Hardy sharing her appreciation of his works, 9 May 1922

3rd July, 1922: Letter from Nina Douglas-Hamilton to Thomas Hardy [H.2800]

Letter from the Duchess of Hamilton to Thomas Hardy on slaughterhouse reform, 3 July 1922

9th November, 1922: Letter from Florence Henniker to [H.3192A]

Statement from Florence Henniker stipulating that on her death all the letters she received from Thomas Hardy should be given to Florence Hardy, 9 November 1922

17th May, 1923: Letter from Virginia Woolf to Thomas Hardy [H.5955]

Letter from Virginia Woolf to Thomas Hardy asking him to write something for The Nation and Athenaeum, 17 May 1923

10th November, 1923: Letter from Nina Douglas-Hamilton to Thomas Hardy [H.2802]

Letter from the Duchess of Hamilton to Thomas Hardy inviting him to be a vice president of the Anti-Vivisection Society, 10 November 1923

28th January, 1924: Letter from Harold Temperley to Thomas Hardy [H.5529]

Letter from Harold Temperley to Thomas Hardy on wife sales in The Mayor of Casterbridge, 28 January 1924

4th February, 1925: Letter from Gertrude Bugler to Thomas Hardy [H.1542]

Letter from Gertrude Bugler, to Thomas Hardy informing him that she will be unable to play the part of Tess in the theatre production of Tess of the d'Urbervilles, 4 February 1925

6th March, 1925: Letter from Marie Flower to Thomas Hardy [H.2410]

Letter from a young reader, Marie Flower, to Thomas Hardy about the "Cliff without a Name", 6 March 1925

8th March, 1925: Letter from Gertrude Bugler to Thomas Hardy [H.1543]

Letter from Gertrude Bugler to Thomas Hardy thanking him for sending her a copy of The Woodlanders, 8 March 1925

10th April, 1925: Letter from Nina Douglas-Hamilton to Thomas Hardy [H.2804]

Letter from the Duchess of Hamilton to Thomas Hardy on humane slaughter methods, 10 April 1925

24th July, 1925: Letter from Harry Timbres to Thomas Hardy [H.4611]

Letter from Harry Timbres to Thomas Hardy sharing his thoughts after reading Tess of the d'Urbervilles, 24 July 1925

4th August, 1925: Letter from Betty Thomas to Thomas Hardy [H.4610]

Letter from a reader, Betty Thomas, to Thomas Hardy asking him to consider her for the role of Tess in a stage production of his novel, 4 August 1925

16th January, 1926: Letter from Lady Hester Pinney to Thomas Hardy [H.4750A]

Letter from Lady Hester Pinney to Thomas Hardy regarding the case of Martha Brown, 16 January 1926

19th January, 1926: Letter from Lina Baumann to Thomas Hardy [H.906]

Letter from a reader, Lina Baumann, to Thomas Hardy showing appreciation for his writing, 19 January 1926

17th May, 1926: Letter from Thomas Lewis to Thomas Hardy [H.3886]

Letter from a reader, Thomas X. Lewis, to Thomas Hardy expressing admiration for his writing, 17 May 1926

[undated]: Letter from William Waters to Thomas Hardy [H.1369]

Birthday postcard from a young reader, William Waters, to Thomas Hardy, circa 2 June 1926

1st June, 1926: Letter from May O'Rourke to Thomas Hardy [H.1365]

Letter from May O'Rourke to Thomas Hardy for his birthday, 1 June 1926

24th August, 1926: Letter from Henry Amos to Thomas Hardy [H.749]

Letter from Henry Amos to Thomas Hardy soliciting a message for the League for the Prohibition of Cruel Sports, 24 August 1926

4th October, 1926: Letter from Wilfred Warner to Thomas Hardy [H.751]

Letter from Wilfred Warner to Thomas Hardy soliciting a message for the League for the Prohibition of Cruel Sports, 4 October 1926

21st January, 1927: Letter from Berkeley Williams to Thomas Hardy [H.5872]

Letter from Berkeley Williams to Thomas Hardy offering condolences on the death of Hardy's dog Wessex, 21 January 1927

5th July, 1927: Letter from Louise Moog to Thomas Hardy [H.4605]

Letter from a reader, Louise Moog, to Thomas Hardy expressing her love for Tess of the d'Urbervilles and her affinity with Tess, 5 July 1927

3rd December, 1927: Letter from Emily Pass to Thomas Hardy [H.4684]

Letter from a reader, Emily Anita Pass, to Thomas Hardy telling him how much she enjoyed reading Tess of the d'Urbervilles and related to the heroine, 3 December 1927